All posts filed under: LONDON

“Georgia O’Keeffe” Exhibition Review by Ludovica Colacino

Georgia O’Keeffe. It’s part of the human nature to try and categorize a subject in order to understand it in depth. Though, there is an exception to this unwritten rule of human behavior: rationalization, however, it may increase the separation between a subject and its viewer – which will inevitably lead to only a projection of what we think it’s real. Georgia O’Keeffe was an artist that critics have struggled to put in a determined artistic movement – today we refer to her as the American icon of modernism, even if it covers over one hundred years from the 1850s to roughly the 1960s. O’Keeffe’s extensive archive and studies show how she kept herself distant from the majority of the artistic movements and groups, but only channeled her true self in company of her partner, the American photographer Alfred Stieglitz. Alfred and Georgia’s intimacy is reflected in the works of both of them: Stieglitz would often ask Georgia to pose for him and focused his attention on her hands, face, or her body as whole. …

“Gender by Design”, by Emily Stoker

Gender by design. Fashion is a new way into the feminist conversation. With designers such as Timur Kim, and Grace Wales Bonner, furthering the new feminist agenda by creating clothes that unite rather than divide. Their designs elicit a sex-positive strength that reinforces the gradual dissolution of gender binaries in the fashion industry. Supporting their efforts are independent publications such as The Gentlewoman, and Riposte, who encourage the application of feminist thinking in all areas of the arts, both online and offline. The growing support from the editorial industry is crucial, as it motivates artists with similar principles to create enduring, referential and self-explicating work. Moving our culture and communities towards a shared value system based on equality and helping gender bias to dissipate. The aforementioned designers are in good company, as they work with their teams to ensure equality is maintained throughout the entire design process. Using feminine and masculine reference materials to plan and develop concepts for their collections. Filtered into pattern cutting and construction techniques which give greater flexibility in shape and silhouette. Unisex brand …

“Body Honesty”, by Abi Buchanan

Body Honesty. I’m going to say it. The word that has women quaking in their boots, living off black coffee and cashew nuts, gulping air for lunch. Fat. The word that’s the strongest weapon in anyone’s arsenal, the insult that’s guaranteed to hit where it hurts. This is the word that taught us a BLT is ‘naughty’, and that allowed a diet industry worth 2 billion pounds to flourish. In February 2016, I attended London Fashion Week. I wandered spellbound around presentation after presentation, seeing racks of beautiful clothes in a size I usually reserve for my feet: a tiny 4, contrasting starkly with my cumbersome 12. I could probably fit one thigh in the dresses, one arm in the trouser legs. Women this size, had I not seen them in the flesh, could be creatures of myth. My self-consciousness was further exacerbated at a show I attended one afternoon, where I, the event photographer, was mingling and snapping the guests. I knew no one and so was sitting by myself drinking a beer (a …

“Loving Your Lines”, by Amy Jackson

Loving Your Lines. For centuries, women’s bodies have been under scrutiny, and society typically focuses on a perfectly smooth, hairless, curved in all the right places female body, resulting in surprise and often shock when faced with the true human form in all its spotty glory! In recent years, however, there’s been an increase in people’s acceptance and honesty towards their bodies, and amongst other breakthroughs such as body diversity, stretch marks are finally being celebrated. Stretch marks are an inevitable part of life that almost every person encounters in some form. They can happen for lots of different reasons, such as weight gain, muscle gain, weight loss and pregnancy, and to people of all shapes and sizes. Chrissy Teigen hit headlines last month after posting a Snapchat that revealed her post-childbirth stretch marks, proving even models aren’t perfect, and just as human as the rest of us. This celebration of stretch marks has been an artistic inspiration for many. Photographer Chloe Newman, has created a series of images that highlight the beauty of the …

“Alessandro Michele & Gucci”, by Amy Jackson

Alessandro Michele & Gucci: the Michele Effect. Fashion Philosophy’s Amy Jackson investigates Gucci’s growing popularity under its Creative Director, Alessandro Michele. * Hailed as the highest selling Italian brand, Gucci is a name that’s always been synonymous with luxury. Whether it be their leather loafers or bamboo-handle tote bag, it’s likely most fashion lovers have a soft spot for at least one classic Gucci item. When Frida Giannini, the labels beloved creative director of many years was forced to leave the brand due to a decline in sales, Gucci looked to a new designer to pick up the pieces. The decision to appoint unknown designer Alessandro Michele as the new creative director of the brand was a surprising one, especially with such big names as Ricardo Tisci, Christopher Kane and Hedi Slimane being rumoured to take the spotlight. The buzz surrounding Michele’s new role, however, was high, and many believed his unknown stance in the fashion world was one of the reasons for the attention and excitement around his debut collection. Michele’s first collections reflected a mixture between …

“Bowie’s Band of Outsiders”, by Nicole Clinton

Fashion Philosophy‘s Nicole Clinton, considers David Bowie’s stylisation of the outcast and its effect on his followers. * No-one personified the intersection between fashion and music more than David Bowie. In fact, considering that his amalgamation of the two media verged on art and that he also dabbled in film, he could certainly be placed firmly in the centre of the Venn diagram of modern culture. He was one of those rare figures whose work marked a collision of pop-culture and high-culture. Following his death, the public lamented the loss of an icon and the legacy that was revered by many Bowie fans was that he showed the downtrodden outcast (that they themselves confessed to have been) that it was okay to be different. This, he most certainly did. However, was every person who claimed that Bowie helped them to accept their outsider status actually an outsider to begin with? Or did Bowie’s image make the strange so alluring that even a very average person wanted to see themselves as alien in order to feel …

“The Daring Buds of Dior”, by Nicole Clinton

The Daring Buds of Dior. One of our newly joined writers, Nicole Clinton, explores Dior’s fixation with flowers and the possible reasoning behind it. – – – From the time of its inception as a fashion house in December 1946, Dior’s collections have drawn inspiration from flowers and their related connotations. After showcasing his first collection in February 1947, the label’s founding father, Christian Dior, supposedly exclaimed: “I have designed flower women”. The brand’s reliance on floral configurations meandered its way through the last 69 years to culminate in a botanical extravaganza last autumn, when its most recent creative director, Raf Simons, exhibited his effeminate Spring/Summer 2016 lines on a catwalk engulfed in walls of luscious flowerbeds. The fact that the flower theme is still being upheld by the house so obviously leads us to wonder: why is it that Christian Dior exuded a fixation with flowers and why did his most recent predecessor find it relevant to reignite said preoccupation today? The root of Dior’s infatuation with floral motifs may be uncovered through studying the …

“Pas en Service”, Editorial by Stephanie Alcaino

Pas en Service, Editorial featuring model Connie Robinson @ Premier Models, photographed by Stephanie Alcaino. Published in Fashion Philosophy: the Art Issue, available *here*. Hair and make-up by Sharon Massey, styling by Hannah Sargeant. Connie is wearing: cami and shorts from ASOS, blouse from Pitchouguina, sandals from Sadie Clayton (image 1). Two piece top and shorts from Simon Ekrelius (image 2). Bralet is stylist’s own, and culottes from Three Floor (image 3). Jumpsuit is stylist’s own, and sandals from Sadie Clayton (image 4). Jumpsuit from Zara (image 5). And finally, body from River Island (image 6).