All posts filed under: ILLUSTRATION

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“Georgia O’Keeffe” Exhibition Review by Ludovica Colacino

Georgia O’Keeffe. It’s part of the human nature to try and categorize a subject in order to understand it in depth. Though, there is an exception to this unwritten rule of human behavior: rationalization, however, it may increase the separation between a subject and its viewer – which will inevitably lead to only a projection of what we think it’s real. Georgia O’Keeffe was an artist that critics have struggled to put in a determined artistic movement – today we refer to her as the American icon of modernism, even if it covers over one hundred years from the 1850s to roughly the 1960s. O’Keeffe’s extensive archive and studies show how she kept herself distant from the majority of the artistic movements and groups, but only channeled her true self in company of her partner, the American photographer Alfred Stieglitz. Alfred and Georgia’s intimacy is reflected in the works of both of them: Stieglitz would often ask Georgia to pose for him and focused his attention on her hands, face, or her body as whole. …

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On Comic Sans

WE ALL NEED TO RECONSIDER COMIC SANS MS, LIKE YESTERDAY. Although 1998 feels like last year, we wore 2000 glasses and shouted the goofy “see you next century” sixteen years ago already. It’s like a decade has gone in a minute. I’m not nostalgic, but I was thrilled about the strong return of the 90s in fashion. As many raised-by-the-Spice-Girls kids, wearing fishnets and chokers feels natural. We don’t have to try too hard, it’s just who we are. But we also know the 90s are not only about that. It might be okay for someone who just bought an “I Heart the 90s” H&M t-shirt two weeks ago, but for the Schott progeny, the come back of this iconic decade is completely incomplete without Comic Sans MS. If we’re talking 90s material, what is more representative of this era than the “best font in the world”? And why is it not the one you chose for your latest tattoo? One word. Popularity. People crave distinction to the point of hating anything they love when …

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Searching for Inspiration

Sometimes finding inspiration for a new creative project can be a task in itself. We have all been there – sitting at the desk, staring into the computer screen and wishing our brain would just magically click and let you have an out-pouring of amazing ideas, but unfortunately inspiration just doesn’t work like that. #1 / STEP AWAY FROM THE DESK One of the best ways to find inspiration for projects is to actually get away from the space that you work in, get out of the familiar and see what happens. This can really help if you’re feeling stressed about your work, because you might just be going over the problems too much, when really all you need is to clear your head. This could start by simply taking a break and going for a walk. When I do this I always take my camera, it’s relaxing and when the mind is at rest new ideas can evolve and take shape. #2 / TAKE A WALK You might already know what places inspire you. For …

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Exhibitions [London] – February Edit

New Exhibitions/What’s On, February in London. Royal Academy of Arts * Painting the Modern Gardens – Monet to Matisse, 30 January — 20 April 2016. The representation of the modern garden is the conductor thread that connects all the paintings exhibited – starting from the early impressionism of Monet and – chronologically speaking – ending with Matisse. This major RA exhibition is recommended to those interested in the history of art and painting. Thinking Through Drawing, 03 September 2015 — 14 February 2016. Premiums: Interim Projects 2016, 12 – 21 February 2016 (annual) [free admission]. Ai Weiwei 360, 20 January – 20 November 2016. Tate Modern * Alexander Calder, 11 November 2015 – 3 April 2016. Abstract art acquires fluidity and movement with Alexander Calder’s sculptures – conveying a sense of lightness within the viewer. Recommended to those interested in sculpture, history of art, and modern art. Performing for the Camera, 18 February – 12 June 2016. Somerset House * Big Bang Data, 03 December 2015 – 20 March 2016. Big Bang Data unveils how internet data is created …

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“David Bowie: Life in Fashion” by Abi Buchanan

Written by Abi Buchanan, with accompanying illustrations by Helen Green. Yesterday we lost a visionary, an inspiration to so many, a creative force in the best way possible and a musician who we were so lucky to have existed at the same time as. With a multi-faceted artistic career spanning over half a century, David Bowie is one of the few names we have that means something to those born in the nineties as much as those born in the sixties and one of the few musicians who has truly covered as much ground in fashion as in the music industry. The universality of his message has brought hope and a place to belong to people of all situations all over the world – as Caitlin Moran so beautifully put last night in The Times, ‘Difference and marginalisation were never his burden, but his muse. He breathed them in, and breathed them out.’ Last night a crowd of thousands gathered in Bowie’s birthplace of Brixton [London] to pay tribute his music – and here I hope to …

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In an interview with Alice Kiteley

Written by Jessica Holden, featuring illustrations and photographs by Alice Kiteley. Alice Kiteley is an illustrator, originally from the West Midlands and a recent graduate from the Liverpool School of Art and Design. She has studied Graphic Design and Illustration, and works in many different mediums including screen printing, Photoshop and collage. Jessica Holden: Hello Alice! What are your biggest inspirations? Alice Kiteley: Inspiration for me comes in many different forms; I love history and nostalgia. Old photographs and films are something that I go back to time and time again. Narrative is also a big inspiration for me; stories have always interested me, being able to bring those stories to life is what I love to do. JH: Who influences you as an artist? AK: Illustrators like Ellen Surrey, Lizzy Stewart and Carson Ellis. I also love the work of screen printer Kate Gibb, and my favourite classical painters Vermeer and Mary Blair. JH: When/How did your artistic path start? AK: For as long as I can remember I have always made things. As a child I remember painting …