All posts filed under: ICONIC ARTICLES

“About Fashion”, by Nicole Clinton

The Oxford English Dictionary’s definition of the word ‘fashion’ is “a popular trend; producing and marketing styles of clothing etc.”, only barely verges on the true meaning and potential of fashion. While it often finds itself unjustly dismissed as a subject of frivolity, this is a grave misconception. Fashion’s function is in fact so complex that it is rooted in paradox as it operates on the basis of the amalgamation of opposites. Its effects can mirror the cathartic power of any good piece of art, ranging from awe to tragedy to comedy. It performs as a reputable tool for the sociological study of any given era, race or gender and also acts as both a physical manifestation and stimulus of psychological feelings. Fashion is a soldier of great valour, honoured with the task of executing its duties in opposing territories. It possesses the ability to serve contradictory purposes through its paradoxical functions. For example, fashion is a means through which one may stand out from the crowd by exemplifying a unique sense of style. But …

“Bowie’s Band of Outsiders”, by Nicole Clinton

Fashion Philosophy‘s Nicole Clinton, considers David Bowie’s stylisation of the outcast and its effect on his followers. * No-one personified the intersection between fashion and music more than David Bowie. In fact, considering that his amalgamation of the two media verged on art and that he also dabbled in film, he could certainly be placed firmly in the centre of the Venn diagram of modern culture. He was one of those rare figures whose work marked a collision of pop-culture and high-culture. Following his death, the public lamented the loss of an icon and the legacy that was revered by many Bowie fans was that he showed the downtrodden outcast (that they themselves confessed to have been) that it was okay to be different. This, he most certainly did. However, was every person who claimed that Bowie helped them to accept their outsider status actually an outsider to begin with? Or did Bowie’s image make the strange so alluring that even a very average person wanted to see themselves as alien in order to feel …