All posts filed under: BEAUTY

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“Body Honesty”, by Abi Buchanan

Body Honesty. I’m going to say it. The word that has women quaking in their boots, living off black coffee and cashew nuts, gulping air for lunch. Fat. The word that’s the strongest weapon in anyone’s arsenal, the insult that’s guaranteed to hit where it hurts. This is the word that taught us a BLT is ‘naughty’, and that allowed a diet industry worth 2 billion pounds to flourish. In February 2016, I attended London Fashion Week. I wandered spellbound around presentation after presentation, seeing racks of beautiful clothes in a size I usually reserve for my feet: a tiny 4, contrasting starkly with my cumbersome 12. I could probably fit one thigh in the dresses, one arm in the trouser legs. Women this size, had I not seen them in the flesh, could be creatures of myth. My self-consciousness was further exacerbated at a show I attended one afternoon, where I, the event photographer, was mingling and snapping the guests. I knew no one and so was sitting by myself drinking a beer (a …

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“Loving Your Lines”, by Amy Jackson

Loving Your Lines. For centuries, women’s bodies have been under scrutiny, and society typically focuses on a perfectly smooth, hairless, curved in all the right places female body, resulting in surprise and often shock when faced with the true human form in all its spotty glory! In recent years, however, there’s been an increase in people’s acceptance and honesty towards their bodies, and amongst other breakthroughs such as body diversity, stretch marks are finally being celebrated. Stretch marks are an inevitable part of life that almost every person encounters in some form. They can happen for lots of different reasons, such as weight gain, muscle gain, weight loss and pregnancy, and to people of all shapes and sizes. Chrissy Teigen hit headlines last month after posting a Snapchat that revealed her post-childbirth stretch marks, proving even models aren’t perfect, and just as human as the rest of us. This celebration of stretch marks has been an artistic inspiration for many. Photographer Chloe Newman, has created a series of images that highlight the beauty of the …

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“The Art of the Second Skin”, by Nicole Clinton

The Art of the Second Skin. Nicole Clinton examines the perception of makeup and how it affects our use of the medium in an essay written for Fashion Philosophy. * The mentality surrounding makeup and the reasons behind why it is worn are extremely multifaceted. How we view makeup personally, as an individual, or collectively, as a particular group or society, is significant in how we employ the medium and in our consciousness of our decision to create a given look. While a cloud of misconceptions is known to follow it, makeup plays a lead role in style, creative expression, and self-image. We’ll be exploring whether this misunderstood medium belongs to the realm of fashion, body or art and question the relevance of its criticisms. Makeup could be viewed as an extension of fashion and thus as an external entity that we add to our natural form. If it is perceived from this angle, then yes, it is an artificial object by nature (in the same way that a dress or jacket may be) but this …

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Inspiration #25: Bella Hadid for EXIT Magazine

Model Bella Hadid photographed by David Roemer for an editorial feature in EXIT Magazine’s Spring 2016 issue. Styled by Sam Ranger, featuring dress and gown offerings from Calvin Klein, Ralph Lauren, Moschino, Chanel and Hèrmes. Blog post compiled by Editor-in-Chief, Dominika Wojciechowska.

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“The Daring Buds of Dior”, by Nicole Clinton

The Daring Buds of Dior. One of our newly joined writers, Nicole Clinton, explores Dior’s fixation with flowers and the possible reasoning behind it. – – – From the time of its inception as a fashion house in December 1946, Dior’s collections have drawn inspiration from flowers and their related connotations. After showcasing his first collection in February 1947, the label’s founding father, Christian Dior, supposedly exclaimed: “I have designed flower women”. The brand’s reliance on floral configurations meandered its way through the last 69 years to culminate in a botanical extravaganza last autumn, when its most recent creative director, Raf Simons, exhibited his effeminate Spring/Summer 2016 lines on a catwalk engulfed in walls of luscious flowerbeds. The fact that the flower theme is still being upheld by the house so obviously leads us to wonder: why is it that Christian Dior exuded a fixation with flowers and why did his most recent predecessor find it relevant to reignite said preoccupation today? The root of Dior’s infatuation with floral motifs may be uncovered through studying the …

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Inspiration #24: Edie Campbell for Vogue Paris

Model Edie Campbell photographed by Harley Weir for Vogue Paris, March 2016 issue. Styled by Jane How, make-up by Miranda Joyce, hair by Anthony Turner, and nails by Adam Slee. * Blog post compiled by Editor-in-Chief, Dominika Wojciechowska.

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Inspiration #23: Anna Ewers for ‘Stern Mode’ Magazine

Model Anna Ewers photographed by Ryan McGinley, a fine artist, in an editorial for ‘Stern Mode‘ Magazine Spring/Summer 2016 issue. Styled by Julia von Boegm. * Blog post compiled by Editor-in-Chief, Dominika Wojciechowska.

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“Pas en Service”, Editorial by Stephanie Alcaino

Pas en Service, Editorial featuring model Connie Robinson @ Premier Models, photographed by Stephanie Alcaino. Published in Fashion Philosophy: the Art Issue, available *here*. Hair and make-up by Sharon Massey, styling by Hannah Sargeant. Connie is wearing: cami and shorts from ASOS, blouse from Pitchouguina, sandals from Sadie Clayton (image 1). Two piece top and shorts from Simon Ekrelius (image 2). Bralet is stylist’s own, and culottes from Three Floor (image 3). Jumpsuit is stylist’s own, and sandals from Sadie Clayton (image 4). Jumpsuit from Zara (image 5). And finally, body from River Island (image 6).